Making Christmas ornaments is a fun endeavor for anyone in the holiday spirit.  After all, there’s always room for one more ornament on the tree, right?  I proved this point when decorating our tree this year.  It is my and my husband’s first Christmas as newlyweds under one roof, which means combining our Christmas ornaments onto one tree.  One very well adorned tree.  After using almost all of my husband’s extensive ornament collection (he’s crazy for Christmas), I surprisingly put up about half of my mega Costco sized ornament box.

My reason for making ornaments was more for the purpose of finding a fun craft activity to do for the holidays than the need for another ornament.  I’ve been working on the crafting class side of Pop Craft for a few months now, and my original plan of renting a space to hold BYOB classes is being re-envisioned to hosting craft nights at local bars.  While I don’t think I’ll be throwing my launch party before the holidays, I might pull this out as a fun activity at a holiday party I’m hosting.

Making the clay

I used an air-dry clay to make these ornaments (who has time to bake something overnight?).  I researched a few recipes, but I decided on the baking soda and cornstarch version on the Arm & Hammer website.  It came together in less time than it said, it’s a clean white color, and it dried solid and strong.

Forming the feather

I was inspired by feather ornaments I found on Pinterest (I have a soft spot for anything bird related).  They are super easy to make and look amazing.  To make the feather start with a small amount of clay rolled into a cylinder.  Lay it down and press out the edges, leaving a ridge in the center as the shaft of the feather.  Work it into something that resembles a feather overall.  Then with a toothpick press out the lines in the feather, working your way from bottom to top on both sides.  Make a hole in the quill for hanging.

I didn’t have the patience to wait for these to dry overnight, so I painted them after only a few minutes of drying and they turned out just fine.  The thicker parts of the shaft were most prone to cracking as they dried, but the cracks were on the underside so it didn’t affect the aesthetics.  After these dry, introduce them to their new branch on your tree.

What do you think?  Would you enjoy making these ornaments at a craft and carry class at a bar?